Dallas Guitar Academy offers class lessons, private guitar and bass instruction, master classes, and artist clinics in North Dallas, Texas. All DGA instructors are experienced music teachers with confirmed references and degrees and/or certification in their chosen fields of expertise. Written letters of recommendation for all DGA instructors are available upon request. The DGA accreditation process means that you can be confident your DGA experience will be positive, with the highest standards of professionalism and customer courtesy.
Practice at least 20 minutes 6 days a week. Consistent practice will allow you to improve your guitar playing skills over a short period. Taking long breaks and not staying dedicated will wear away your muscle memory and delay the development of your skills. Instead, dedicate 20 minutes to an hour of practice throughout most of the week. During practice, you can either run different drills or you can try covering a song.[14]
Private in person guitar lessons with a skilled instructor that is focused on you, your interests, and your progress is the most sought after experience and hard to replicate online. Plus, you tend to learn faster in person. On the other hand, online guitar lessons are quickly becoming popular. The selection of teachers is not limited to those in your geographical area and you can communicate via video in real time with your teacher in the comfort of your home. When filling out your request on Lessons.com, we recommend you select both online and local options, then compare your options and see what works best for you.
Learn barre chords. Barre chords, or movable chords, are extremely useful for starting to play songs. In a barre chord (sometimes shortened to "bar chord"), the index finger of your fretting hand "bars" all the notes at a single fret. To play an F, which is the barre chord in first position, you bar all the notes on the first fret with your index finger and play what is essentially the shape of the E chord moved one step up the neck, with your middle, ring, and pinkie.[8]
You can record anything played by this virtual guitar and play it back at will. To start and stop recording check and uncheck the box RECORD. A playback button will appear automatically. You can have many playback buttons: each with its own recording. You can even play back more than one recording at the same time while making another recording to combine them.
Dwayne Bollmeyer, Performer and Instructor, as well as DJB Musical Enterprises are based in Arlington, Texas since 1987.Specializing in Rock, Blues, jazz and classical Guitar and Bass Lessons and Instruction in Fort Worth, Dallas and the North Texas Area featuring a warm and friendly musical learning environment. DJB Musical Enterprises also books live music and entertainment for your special occasion for brides, planners and wedding vendors including entertainment for wedding receptions. ... View Profile
Now I know you might be confused by this diagram, so let's take a moment to explain it. First off, the top of the diagram corresponds to the nut on your guitar, that's the part where the strings end, farthest from your body. Left to right, the strings are 6,5,4,3,2,1. So as you look at the diagram, the string on the left is actually the 6th string on your guitar, the low E string.
Learn barre chords. Barre chords, or movable chords, are extremely useful for starting to play songs. In a barre chord (sometimes shortened to "bar chord"), the index finger of your fretting hand "bars" all the notes at a single fret. To play an F, which is the barre chord in first position, you bar all the notes on the first fret with your index finger and play what is essentially the shape of the E chord moved one step up the neck, with your middle, ring, and pinkie.[8]

Try listening to different styles of music for inspiration as you learn to play. If you're trying to learn to play by ear, listen to the blues and try to mimic that sound. Blues progressions are especially great for learning to play guitar because it's built on the basics of music theory. Once you learn those progressions, you can start practicing them in different keys, as well.
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Alright, are you ready to learn your first guitar chord? It's called an E minor. There are two basic types of chords you'll come across, major and minor. Major chords don't have anything after them, ie we just call them G, or C, or E etc. For minor chords however, we abbreviate the minor into just 'm' and add that onto the end of the chord. So, Em.

Start playing the different notes and hold the different shapes. Once you have a basic understanding of how the notes are played throughout the song, you can start to hold each of the chords. If the song consists of chords that you're used to playing, it will make the process easier. If the song uses different chords, it may take some time and adjustment to get used to them. Practice the chords separately if they are unfamiliar to you.[11]

Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[7]
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.

I am a guitarist,bassist,engineer,producer,and sessionplayer with over 22 years experience in music.I have a Bachelor's Degree in Classical Guitar from Dallas Baptist University and an Associate of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sound Recording Technology from Cedar Valley College.One of my greatest strengths as an instructor is the type of versatility that comes from my own gigging experience in classical,jazz,worship styles,country,rock,blues,rn'b and more.I custom tailor my curriculum to the interests/abilities of my students and strive to help them reach their musical ad professional goals.I offer guitar lessons,bass lessons,music productio ... View Profile


Manage the finger pain. There'll be a point at which things will seem bleak: you can't quite get to each chord as fast as you want, your fingers are killing you, and it seems easier to put the thing back in its case. The reason most guitar players stop playing a few weeks in is that it hurts. After a couple of months and years of playing, callouses will build up on the fingers of your fretting hand that will greatly reduce the pain of pushing down the strings for long periods of time. Everyone who learns to play the guitar has to deal with sore fingers at the beginning. Learn to love the pain and associate it with everything that you love about music and the guitar.
Learn barre chords. Barre chords, or movable chords, are extremely useful for starting to play songs. In a barre chord (sometimes shortened to "bar chord"), the index finger of your fretting hand "bars" all the notes at a single fret. To play an F, which is the barre chord in first position, you bar all the notes on the first fret with your index finger and play what is essentially the shape of the E chord moved one step up the neck, with your middle, ring, and pinkie.[8]
Play Guitar! turns your Windows 8 machine into a virtual guitar. You can press and strum strings, just like a real guitar. Play Guitar! helps you learn what notes lie on the frets of the guitar. It is a very useful tool for every aspiring guitarist. Now, there are available an advanced chord editor and the possibility to use guitar capo (only for PRO users, In-app purchase) The app is easy to use and light.

Using the same claw-like finger positioning on the second fret, you can play an F# chord. Move to the third fret, and it becomes a G chord. It's a difficult finger positioning to learn, but you can start playing the chords to any rock or pop song relatively quickly when you learn to strum and play barre chords. The Ramones, for example, used nothing but barre chords to great effect.
You can record anything played by this virtual guitar and play it back at will. To start and stop recording check and uncheck the box RECORD. A playback button will appear automatically. You can have many playback buttons: each with its own recording. You can even play back more than one recording at the same time while making another recording to combine them.
Guitar Compass features hundreds of free guitar lesson videos. These online lessons are designed to teach you how to play guitar by covering the absolute basics up to more advanced soloing concepts and techniques. The lessons span different difficultly levels and genres like blues, rock, country, and jazz. Each lesson is designed to introduce you to a subject and get to know our instructors and their teaching style. To access more lessons and in-depth instruction, try a free 7 day trial of our premium membership.
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