I have heard how giving you are in so many respects of music schooling and I must say that I am impressed. You remind me of the pure idealism that we had in starting Apple. If I were young, with time, I'd likely offer to join and help you in your endeavours. Keep making people happy, not just in their own learning, but in the example you set for them. 

"We come to you for private music lessons! My father used to sit in his car, in front of my teacher's house for 2 hours a week when I was growing up, with the hot New Mexico sun beating down on him. Having a teacher come to your house and teach the lesson in your home saves up to an hour a week of your time round trip. With our business model, while your child is taking lessons, you can prepare dinner, help another kid with their homework, finish up work, or catch up with friends and family over the phone - anything else but wait in a studio for the lesson to finish, or be stuck in traffic. Our teachers are highly qualified. They all have music degrees or equivalent work experience, and they are positive and professional with their students. I love teaching music lessons. It is extremely rewarding to teach people new things, and cultivate artistry and musicianship in another person. Kids in music lessons are more confident in band, and they have a network of friends and band members they will cherish for a lifetime. Our teachers have passed a background check, and they have made it through an audition screen. We don't hire just anyone - we make sure they understand music theory, and that they are top notch players. Invest in yourself!"
Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[7]
Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.

Hold your guitar correctly. When you are sitting down, there are two main ways to hold your guitar. For a casual playing style, lay the guitar over your dominant leg. On the other hand, the classical method has you set your guitar on your non-dominant leg. In both instances, make sure that the guitar is held close against your body. Holding your guitar properly makes it easier to play and prevents you from becoming fatigued. Play around with both styles and figure out which one is most comfortable for you.[2]


Practice at least 20 minutes 6 days a week. Consistent practice will allow you to improve your guitar playing skills over a short period. Taking long breaks and not staying dedicated will wear away your muscle memory and delay the development of your skills. Instead, dedicate 20 minutes to an hour of practice throughout most of the week. During practice, you can either run different drills or you can try covering a song.[14]
These beginner guitar lessons cover everything you need to know in order to get started playing the guitar. You'll learn the basics like how to hold the guitar, how to tune a guitar, and what all the parts of the guitar are called. Then you'll move on to learning essential guitar chords, strumming techniques, and how to put everything together to play your first song. These beginner guitar lessons are essential for anyone that has always wanted to play the guitar, but never knew where to start.
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