Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.
Alright, now you know five chords. But what’s next? How do you keep moving forward and improving on the guitar? If you’ve made it this far, I highly recommend joining my free email newsletter. As my thanks for signing up, I’ll send you a free ebook with all the best chords for a beginner to learn to play guitar with. As well, you’ll receive a free video lesson once a week that will dig into a particular technique or idea on the guitar. It’s tons of fun, and you’ll learn lots along the way! Sign up below…
Open up audio for the riff and follow the tabs. Open the song that you're covering in another window on your internet browser. Play through the song and trace the chords and notes with the tab that you looked up. Try to follow the numbers on the tab with the notes that are being played in the song. Try to get an understanding for which chords the artist is playing before trying to duplicating it.
I have been playing piano and guitar since before my first memories as a child! I have a passion for music that shows. From being classically trained in piano, to conducting my high school marching band, to leading worship at my local church, to playing saxophone in numerous jazz combos/big bands, and singing in my university's choir, I truly have a diverse range of musicality and will use everything that I have learned to make you the musician you aspire to be! I am currently studying music theory at Dallas Baptist University where I am being equipped to be a composer (which is my dream). I am in my second year of college. Thank you for chec ... View Profile
Minutes 30-60. Practice making the basic 5 shapes. This is probably the hardest part. You gotta put your head down for 30 minutes and remember the chords that are demonstrated below. Once you start getting these shapes down, adding to your portfolio will be easy. You can even experiment with adding and removing fingers– you’ll find a lot of cool sounds here and you’ll continue to discover these for years to come.

I love love love these guitars. No gimmicks. They are pure class (but are capable of absolute fury!) :) Think a Telecaster can’t rock? Johnny Greenwood respectfully disagrees. Check out Bonnie Raitt using a Strat to lay down some nasty slide licks. SRV nearly tears the strings off his Strat. Would you prefer something a little funkier? Here’s Prince playing the greatest guitar solo of all time on a Telecaster.


To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
Brent Bassham began playing guitar at the age of fifteen as a self-taught until he began his studies as a freshman at Tyler Junior College. His talents were recognized by his instructor Frank Kimlicko who awarded him with scholarships and twice as the Outstanding Guitar Student of the year. He has been taught by master teachers such as Brian Head (president of Guitar Foundation of America), Miguel Antonio, Grammy Winner Maestro Pepe Romero, and Grammy winner William Kanengiser. He has also been selected to perform in public master classes with: Pepe Romero, Angel Romero, Enric Madrigera, and David Russell. He learned a wide range of ... View Profile
Justin is an instructor with that rare combination that encompasses great playing in conjunction with a thoughtful, likable personality. Justin's instruction is extremely intelligent because he's smart enough to know the 'basics' don't have to be served 'raw' - Justin keenly serves the information covered in chocolate. Justin's site is like a free pass in a candy store!
Use tabs instead of sheet music. If you don't already know how to read music, it can take a lot of time to memorize and proficiently read sheet music. Tabs are an easier and more intuitive way to write music for beginners that doesn't require any formal education. Tabs will simply tell you where to put your fingers on a fret board and how to generally play a song.[8]
Español: tocar la guitarra, Deutsch: Gitarre spielen lernen, Português: Tocar Guitarra, Français: jouer de la guitare, Русский: играть на гитаре, 中文: 弹吉他, Čeština: Jak se naučit hrát na kytaru, Bahasa Indonesia: Bermain Gitar, हिन्दी: गिटार बजाएं, العربية: العزف على الجيتار, Tiếng Việt: Chơi Đàn Ghi ta, Italiano: Suonare la Chitarra, 日本語: ギターを弾く, ไทย: เล่นกีตาร์, Nederlands: Gitaar spelen, 한국어: 기타 치는 법, Türkçe: Gitar Nasıl Çalınır

The reason I gave you Em and Am first was because those two chords are among the easiest for a beginner to wrap their fingers around. However, the three chords we’re going to look at now, G, C, and D are all incredibly important chords on the guitar, and together they are the three major chords in the key of G major. If you want to learn to play guitar, you need these chords!
I have been playing piano and guitar since before my first memories as a child! I have a passion for music that shows. From being classically trained in piano, to conducting my high school marching band, to leading worship at my local church, to playing saxophone in numerous jazz combos/big bands, and singing in my university's choir, I truly have a diverse range of musicality and will use everything that I have learned to make you the musician you aspire to be! I am currently studying music theory at Dallas Baptist University where I am being equipped to be a composer (which is my dream). I am in my second year of college. Thank you for chec ... View Profile

The strings run between the headstock of the guitar, where they are affixed to tuning pegs that can be rotated to tighten and slacken them, and the bridge, where they're fixed to the guitar's body. On an acoustic guitar, the strings are fixed to the bridge with removable pegs, and on an electric guitar the strings are generally strung through an eyelet.

Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
I have been playing piano and guitar since before my first memories as a child! I have a passion for music that shows. From being classically trained in piano, to conducting my high school marching band, to leading worship at my local church, to playing saxophone in numerous jazz combos/big bands, and singing in my university's choir, I truly have a diverse range of musicality and will use everything that I have learned to make you the musician you aspire to be! I am currently studying music theory at Dallas Baptist University where I am being equipped to be a composer (which is my dream). I am in my second year of college. Thank you for chec ... View Profile
These lead guitar lessons cover everything you need to know in order to get started with playing lead guitar. You'll learn things like: proper hand technique, the Major Scale, the Major Pentatonic Scale, the Minor Pentatonic Scale, bending technique, vibrato technique, legato technique (hammer-ons and pull-offs), and even how to play your first guitar solo! So, whether you are brand new to playing lead guitar or just want to sharpen your skills - these lead guitar lessons will help.
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