Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Dallas, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
Position your fingers on the neck. The dots on the chords represent where you should hold down your fingers on the neck. For instance, an A major is played by holding down the string on the second fret on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th string. An E minor is played by holding down the second fret on the 5th and 4th string. Hold the strings down until they are pressed against the neck of your guitar.[6]

4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.

Learn how to read guitar tabs. Guitarists have their own system of music notation called guitar tablature, or guitar tabs for short. The basic idea is to look at each line in the "staff" of the tab in the same way you look at your guitar. Each line corresponds to a string, and each number tells you which fret to hold down when plucking that string. For example, to play this tab-notated lick from the Lynyrd Skynyrd song "Sweet Home Alabama," you would play two notes on the open D string, the B string at the third fret, the G string at the second fret, etc.[10]
If you are practicing regularly, like you should be (at least once a day) be sure to change your guitar strings once a month. You will be amazed at how much of a difference in sound quality a fresh pack of strings will make. You don’t need super expensive strings. When I was starting out, I got by quite happily on my local music store’s house brand of strings that cost about $4 a pack.
Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself.

As a beginner, it is best to avoid making a pawn shop, flea market, or yard sale purchase unless you are shopping with somebody who has experience in purchasing a guitar. Having never purchased a guitar, you may not know what to look for in terms of damage or guitar quality. With that being said, a local music retail shop is your best bet. You may also shop online with a reputable company, although be sure to review the business’ return policy.
Guitar lessons can be one of the most useful ways to improve your ability and have more fun playing guitar. Finding the right guitar lessons and the right guitar instructor can be a difficult task: you don't know what you are getting until you try it. Lessons.com is a great space for you to figure out what the best guitar lessons for you are - this can be done with ratings on the site and in extra teacher information. In addition to this, here are some things you can do to find the right guitar lessons and teachers.
You can record anything played by this virtual guitar and play it back at will. To start and stop recording check and uncheck the box RECORD. A playback button will appear automatically. You can have many playback buttons: each with its own recording. You can even play back more than one recording at the same time while making another recording to combine them.

3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
I have been playing piano and guitar since before my first memories as a child! I have a passion for music that shows. From being classically trained in piano, to conducting my high school marching band, to leading worship at my local church, to playing saxophone in numerous jazz combos/big bands, and singing in my university's choir, I truly have a diverse range of musicality and will use everything that I have learned to make you the musician you aspire to be! I am currently studying music theory at Dallas Baptist University where I am being equipped to be a composer (which is my dream). I am in my second year of college. Thank you for chec ... View Profile

Am Strut Solo 1 is a free guitar lesson that will teach you how to play a blues solo over our original Am Strut jam track. Peter Vogl will show you how to use the Am pentatonic scale in the open position, the A natural minor scale, and some outside notes to create a solo. We’ll use hammer-ons, slides, and our right hand to create a more expressive solo. Specifically, we’ll use the thumb instead of a pick to play the strings and add a plucky and funky vibe. Peter will start by walking you through the theory choices and how to play the solo in detail. Next, we’ll practice the whole solo at a reduced speed with a metronome before advancing to playing along with the track. Sign up for a free 7 day trial and access a PDF of the tabs, a downloadable mp3 jam track, and three more solos over this progression.

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