As much as there is to love about Guitar Center Lessons in Central Dallas, the best part of all may be that we're located inside a well-stocked Guitar Center store. That makes us a one-stop shop for everything musical, so when you come in for your first lesson you'll be able to pick up your starter instrument right on the spot. Hours run seven days a week, so it's easy to make a plan that works for you no matter how busy your schedule may be.
Italiano: Imparare velocemente a Suonare la chitarra Acustica, Español: aprender rápidamente a tocar la guitarra por tu cuenta, Français: rapidement apprendre soi même à jouer de la guitare acoustique, Deutsch: Gitarren spielen lernen, Português: Aprender Rápido a Tocar Violão Sozinho, Nederlands: Snel akoestische gitaar leren spelen, 中文: 自学原声吉他速成指南, Русский: самостоятельно быстро научиться играть на акустической гитаре, Bahasa Indonesia: Belajar Gitar Akustik Sendiri Dengan Cepat, ไทย: ฝึกกีตาร์โปร่งให้เป็นเร็วด้วยตัวเอง, العربية: تعلم العزف على الجيتار الصوتي بنفسك
A child as young as 4 can begin to learn if they are really motivated and have a patient, creative, and devoted teacher. However, we've found almost all kids under six are too young to benefit from formal guitar lessons, as they require dexterity and levels of concentration children their age can't provide. That being said, lessons do not need to be formal right off the bat, and can just provide a fun introduction. Also, your child may benefit from using a ukulele to start, as it's smaller and easier to learn, but very similar instrument.
 Larios Music Academy is a Christ centered music school in Grand Prairie, Texas. Students have the ability to learn, perform and create music. Larios Music Academy offers many programs such as music lessons, audio engineering, vocal classes, CD Recording and instrument sales. We have a particular program for every individual student and strive for excellence.

Learning guitar is a lot easier when you have a step-by-step system to follow. Guitar Tricks lessons are interconnected and organized to get slightly harder as you progress. You watch a video lesson, play along, and then click a “Next” button to go to the next lesson. Lessons have multiple camera angles, guitar tabs, jam tracks and everything else you need to learn.
Try listening to different styles of music for inspiration as you learn to play. If you're trying to learn to play by ear, listen to the blues and try to mimic that sound. Blues progressions are especially great for learning to play guitar because it's built on the basics of music theory. Once you learn those progressions, you can start practicing them in different keys, as well.
A few years back, I dusted off the ol' Takamine I got in high school to try some 'music therapy' with my disabled son, who was recovering from a massive at-birth stroke. This reignited my long dormant passion to transform myself from a beach strummer to a 'real' musician; however, as a single mom, taking in-person lessons was financially difficult. Then I found Justinguitar! Flash forward to today; my son is almost fully recovered (YAY!), my guitar collection has grown significantly, and I'm starting to play gigs. None of this would have been possible without your guidance and generosity, Justin. Thank you for being part of the journey!
Now I know you might be confused by this diagram, so let's take a moment to explain it. First off, the top of the diagram corresponds to the nut on your guitar, that's the part where the strings end, farthest from your body. Left to right, the strings are 6,5,4,3,2,1. So as you look at the diagram, the string on the left is actually the 6th string on your guitar, the low E string.
Alright, are you ready to learn your first guitar chord? It's called an E minor. There are two basic types of chords you'll come across, major and minor. Major chords don't have anything after them, ie we just call them G, or C, or E etc. For minor chords however, we abbreviate the minor into just 'm' and add that onto the end of the chord. So, Em.

The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.
As much as there is to love about Guitar Center Lessons in Central Dallas, the best part of all may be that we're located inside a well-stocked Guitar Center store. That makes us a one-stop shop for everything musical, so when you come in for your first lesson you'll be able to pick up your starter instrument right on the spot. Hours run seven days a week, so it's easy to make a plan that works for you no matter how busy your schedule may be.
Using the same claw-like finger positioning on the second fret, you can play an F# chord. Move to the third fret, and it becomes a G chord. It's a difficult finger positioning to learn, but you can start playing the chords to any rock or pop song relatively quickly when you learn to strum and play barre chords. The Ramones, for example, used nothing but barre chords to great effect.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.

Practice playing individual notes. Holding down a string and producing a decent sound can sometimes be more challenging than it looks. If you don't hold down a string hard enough, you'll get a muted note and if you hold down the string too close to the fret your guitar will buzz. Practice picking in an up and down motion on your string with the other hand. Continue doing this until you feel comfortable moving up or down the neck to a different note. Practice playing the notes back and forth until you become comfortable strumming.

I know that for me, I enjoy getting to put the spotlight on my students. I also like haveing concerts for my students to be able to demonstrate their skills for their friends and family. I also can work with students of any age, starting at about age 5 through age 100+. My experiences with teaching children gives me the ability to teach even very young students.
For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
I tried several times over the course of 20 years to learn guitar. I purchased guitars, amps, books, private lessons. Nothing ever stuck, until I found justinguitar.com. The only reason I can play guitar today is because of Justin. His courses are well thought out, easy to understand, easy to follow, and easy to make progress on. I can't think of a single product or service that I've ever used in my life that I could recommend more highly than justinguitar.com.
Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.
Brent Bassham began playing guitar at the age of fifteen as a self-taught until he began his studies as a freshman at Tyler Junior College. His talents were recognized by his instructor Frank Kimlicko who awarded him with scholarships and twice as the Outstanding Guitar Student of the year. He has been taught by master teachers such as Brian Head (president of Guitar Foundation of America), Miguel Antonio, Grammy Winner Maestro Pepe Romero, and Grammy winner William Kanengiser. He has also been selected to perform in public master classes with: Pepe Romero, Angel Romero, Enric Madrigera, and David Russell. He learned a wide range of ... View Profile
"We come to you for private music lessons! My father used to sit in his car, in front of my teacher's house for 2 hours a week when I was growing up, with the hot New Mexico sun beating down on him. Having a teacher come to your house and teach the lesson in your home saves up to an hour a week of your time round trip. With our business model, while your child is taking lessons, you can prepare dinner, help another kid with their homework, finish up work, or catch up with friends and family over the phone - anything else but wait in a studio for the lesson to finish, or be stuck in traffic. Our teachers are highly qualified. They all have music degrees or equivalent work experience, and they are positive and professional with their students. I love teaching music lessons. It is extremely rewarding to teach people new things, and cultivate artistry and musicianship in another person. Kids in music lessons are more confident in band, and they have a network of friends and band members they will cherish for a lifetime. Our teachers have passed a background check, and they have made it through an audition screen. We don't hire just anyone - we make sure they understand music theory, and that they are top notch players. Invest in yourself!"
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