Electric guitar: Well the world of electric guitars is in some ways more complex, as there are all kinds of different looks and technologies. And it’s not good enough to just have a guitar, you need to buy an amplifier as well. I will just recommend mid-level stuff that’s worked for me based on my preferences, but if you like “stuff” and collecting gear, you’ll find playing the guitar to be a deeply satisfying hobby :)

Music has been the cornerstone of my work as a teacher and mentor. Through music, I have found a career, a life path, and a passion to give back to the world. I have survived as a musician overseas in Belize and I learned a lot about the world from my experience in the Caribbean. I have been a professional performer in Dallas since 1999. I have a wide range of influences and since I play drums, guitar, bass, piano and sing... I feel I have a very well-rounded grasp of music that can enhance anyone's style even if you're more experienced than I... I was awarded: John Phillip Souza Leadership Award- 1998 Louis Armstrong Jazz Award- 1998 ... View Profile


You do not need long fingernails to play guitar. In fact, it's best to keep your fingernails short! As for the callouses, these may be unavoidable. If you would like to avoid them as much as possible, ask your guitar instructor about lowering the action of your guitar (the action is the distance between your strings and your frets) so that the frets are easier to press down on.
Download apps that will help you learn how to play. There are apps that you can download to your mobile device that will help you learn how to play the acoustic guitar. These apps range from step-to-step guides on how to play, to apps that can act as mixers and recorders. Go to the app store for your device and try to find some apps that can help you.
Private in person guitar lessons with a skilled instructor that is focused on you, your interests, and your progress is the most sought after experience and hard to replicate online. Plus, you tend to learn faster in person. On the other hand, online guitar lessons are quickly becoming popular. The selection of teachers is not limited to those in your geographical area and you can communicate via video in real time with your teacher in the comfort of your home. When filling out your request on Lessons.com, we recommend you select both online and local options, then compare your options and see what works best for you.
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.
3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
A child as young as 4 can begin to learn if they are really motivated and have a patient, creative, and devoted teacher. However, we've found almost all kids under six are too young to benefit from formal guitar lessons, as they require dexterity and levels of concentration children their age can't provide. That being said, lessons do not need to be formal right off the bat, and can just provide a fun introduction. Also, your child may benefit from using a ukulele to start, as it's smaller and easier to learn, but very similar instrument.

Learning how to play the guitar is an exciting skill that will impress those around you. If you have a passion for music and the acoustic guitar but don't have a lot of time or the patience to learn how to play, you may want to do it quickly. Although mastering the guitar can take decades, there are techniques and methods that you can use to rapidly learn how to play the basics on acoustic guitar. By learning simple open chords, playing guitar tabs, and practicing regularly and correctly, you'll be able to play the acoustic guitar in no time.


Music has been the cornerstone of my work as a teacher and mentor. Through music, I have found a career, a life path, and a passion to give back to the world. I have survived as a musician overseas in Belize and I learned a lot about the world from my experience in the Caribbean. I have been a professional performer in Dallas since 1999. I have a wide range of influences and since I play drums, guitar, bass, piano and sing... I feel I have a very well-rounded grasp of music that can enhance anyone's style even if you're more experienced than I... I was awarded: John Phillip Souza Leadership Award- 1998 Louis Armstrong Jazz Award- 1998 ... View Profile
Learning how to play the guitar is an exciting skill that will impress those around you. If you have a passion for music and the acoustic guitar but don't have a lot of time or the patience to learn how to play, you may want to do it quickly. Although mastering the guitar can take decades, there are techniques and methods that you can use to rapidly learn how to play the basics on acoustic guitar. By learning simple open chords, playing guitar tabs, and practicing regularly and correctly, you'll be able to play the acoustic guitar in no time.

4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
Now I know you might be confused by this diagram, so let's take a moment to explain it. First off, the top of the diagram corresponds to the nut on your guitar, that's the part where the strings end, farthest from your body. Left to right, the strings are 6,5,4,3,2,1. So as you look at the diagram, the string on the left is actually the 6th string on your guitar, the low E string.
I have been playing piano and guitar since before my first memories as a child! I have a passion for music that shows. From being classically trained in piano, to conducting my high school marching band, to leading worship at my local church, to playing saxophone in numerous jazz combos/big bands, and singing in my university's choir, I truly have a diverse range of musicality and will use everything that I have learned to make you the musician you aspire to be! I am currently studying music theory at Dallas Baptist University where I am being equipped to be a composer (which is my dream). I am in my second year of college. Thank you for chec ... View Profile
Brent Bassham began playing guitar at the age of fifteen as a self-taught until he began his studies as a freshman at Tyler Junior College. His talents were recognized by his instructor Frank Kimlicko who awarded him with scholarships and twice as the Outstanding Guitar Student of the year. He has been taught by master teachers such as Brian Head (president of Guitar Foundation of America), Miguel Antonio, Grammy Winner Maestro Pepe Romero, and Grammy winner William Kanengiser. He has also been selected to perform in public master classes with: Pepe Romero, Angel Romero, Enric Madrigera, and David Russell. He learned a wide range of ... View Profile
I've started off a new series with the awesome Ariel Posen, The Captains Privates series is popular as ever and I've also been filling in some beginner lessons of things I get asked about all the time... I'm about to re-kindle the Blues Lead 3 series which fell off the wagon somewhere and also get the gear videos rocking again... so lots in the works, lots going on and still loving it!
Determine the guitar riff that you want to learn. Listen to acoustic guitar songs that you enjoy and choose one that you'd like to learn. When finding your first song, try to find a song that has an easy chord progression. Listen to the song and determine how many chord changes it has and the speed in which the song is played. If there aren't that many chords or the song seems simple to play, you should choose that song as your first song to learn.
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.

Alright, now you know five chords. But what’s next? How do you keep moving forward and improving on the guitar? If you’ve made it this far, I highly recommend joining my free email newsletter. As my thanks for signing up, I’ll send you a free ebook with all the best chords for a beginner to learn to play guitar with. As well, you’ll receive a free video lesson once a week that will dig into a particular technique or idea on the guitar. It’s tons of fun, and you’ll learn lots along the way! Sign up below…


Anybody, of every ability, can play – Designed for every type of learner, ChordBuddy includes modifications that allow individuals of every ability to successfully learn a new instrument. Perfect for use in the music therapy, home, or school setting, ChordBuddy can help individuals learn to play the guitar flat or with two people at a time, making for what is an all-around therapeutic experience.
When you play the right note or chord, you will hear it. It will be a pleasant sound, it will be clear and won't have any blocked string sounds (unless it needs to, but you'll get to that later). To play a note or chord correctly, you have to get your fingers in the right position and press as hard as you can on the frets; it will become a habit if you practice enough.
There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe.
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